As a member of the oldest slice of the Millennial generation, my teenage years spanned the late 1990s through the start of the new millennium. I spent that time watching a lot of MTV's 'Total Request Live', 'Dawson's Creek', and wearing out a dual VHS tape of 'Titanic'.

Kristen Soltis Anderson

Kristen Soltis Anderson

Profession: Author
Nationality: American

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Donald Trump has had political success positioning himself as a 'law-and-order' candidate.

Political science has long tried to tackle a fundamental question of voter behavior: Do voters choose politicians because those politicians hold views that they like, or do voters choose policy positions because the politicians they like say those positions are correct?

I went to Washington, D.C, for the first time my senior year as part of Girls Nation, put on by the American Legion Auxiliary, which sends high school students to D.C. to form a pretend federal government. There was an energy about the city that made me feel like I just had to come back there.

Breaking dramatically with Bush-era Republican orthodoxy, Trump ran on a message of 'America First' and of avoiding spending blood and treasure on adventures overseas.

Overall, America's math scores on the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) have risen since the 1990s though remain disappointing when compared to the rest of the globe.

If there is one issue where one could justifiably assume that Republicans are all in agreement, it is on lowering taxes.

I grew up in Orlando, Florida, and I joined the debate team right around the time of the 2000 election.

Women want fair taxes, a growing economy, affordable health care, secure borders, and the defeat of ISIS. They don't need the solutions to be wrapped in pink. They just want problems solved.

Without a clear diagnosis of why the candidate or party failed, there can be no clear consensus about how to move forward.

When people note that more and more voters are cutting their landline phones and that more and more people are refusing to pick up phone calls from numbers they don't know, they are identifying problems that the polling industry has long struggled with and continue to try to adapt to.

It's not hard to assume that voters do not have deeply considered views on each and every policy issue before them but instead, perhaps, have one or two strongly held views and then allow their favored political leaders to fill in the gaps on the rest of the issues.

I think 'Candy Crush' may be fading in popularity, but there's always something new that's popping up.

On paper, Emmanuel Macron should be a candidate tailor-made for young voters. He himself is young. He pushes for more entrepreneurship, modernization, and a loosening of regulations that prevent young workers from working as they please when they please.

Maybe President Trump will turn out to be a fabulously successful president who will endear the millennial generation to the Right anew.