God is whoever raised Jesus from the dead, having before raised Israel from Egypt. There is no God but this God.

Stanley Hauerwas

Stanley Hauerwas

Profession: Theologian
Nationality: American

Some suggestions for you :

Protestantism became identified with the republican presumption in liberty as an end in itself. This presumption was then reinforced by an unassailable belief in the common sense of the individual.

We complain of the increased tempo of our lives, but our frenetic lives are just reflection of the economic system that we have created.

I am a Protestant. I am a communicant at the Church of the Holy Family, an Episcopal church in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

I am not sure I can make clear what it means to say I come from the Catholic side of Protestantism, but at the very least, it means that I do not think Christianity began with the Reformation.

Let me be clear: I am a Methodist. By that, I mean I think John Wesley was a recovery of Catholic Christianity through disciplined congregational life.

William James was not a prophet. He was a philosopher whose philosophy reflected his profound humanity.

We, like the people of Israel, would like to think we get to name God. By naming God, we hope to get the kind of god we need; that is, a god after our own likeness.

Let us wait in patience for the Christ-child whose own life depended on the lives of Mary and Joseph. The Word of God was made flesh. He came so that we might experience the fullness of time.

I really have lived in books. Books are friends. They are some of the friends that make you who you are.

I am a Congregationalist with Catholic sensibilities. Which probably explains how I ended up in a Episcopal church.

War is America's central liturgical act necessary to renew our sense that we are a nation unlike other nations.

Our sin is exactly the presumption that we can know God or ourselves through our own capacities.

Part of what my work has always been about is to show that the apocalyptic character of the gospel makes the everyday possible. It gives us the time that lets us care for one another as we are ill, helps us care for one another as we experience broken relationships, and helps us take the time to worship God in a world of such violence.

Our hope in life beyond death is a hope made possible, not by some general sentimental belief in life after death, but by our participation in the life of Christ.