People love to talk about new and different. They don't always love to buy and read new and different.

G. Willow Wilson

G. Willow Wilson

Profession: Writer
Nationality: American

Some suggestions for you :

In all likelihood, you've been treated by a Muslim doctor or served by a Muslim waiter or worked beside a Muslim computer programmer. Even if you think, 'I don't know any Muslims,' it's probably not true.

Anytime you're writing stories about a group of people with whom you have limited experience, there's a lot of guesswork.

I didn't believe in spiritual homelands, and found God as readily in a strip mall as in a mosque.

I write about real life as it is lived by the young American Muslim women that I've had the pleasure of meeting throughout the course of my travels as a writer and being able to speak in different places and meet different people at signings and things.

The transition between life in red-state America and life in the Arab capital was at times overwhelming because of the traditional segregation of men and women in many public and private settings.

We don't want to create a literary ghetto in which black writers are only allowed to write black characters and women writers are put on 'girl books.'

The Qur'an is in many ways far less concrete than the Bible, relying on the esoteric more often than the apparent.

There are very religious people who write comics and who love comics.

The great thing about Cairo is the vast majority of women wear some kind of head scarf, but they are also very fashion-conscious. They love bright colors.

'Air' is what the world looks like: An inconvenient mashup of human politics and divine geography. We leave bits and pieces of ourselves and our history in every place we encounter.

When we read fiction, we want to get outside of ourselves and are able to see from a perspective we haven't seen through before. That can be very powerful.

When you write for a comic series, many superheroes have 60 or some years of history that you are coming into.

I think that's a huge theme in superhero books across the board: When you have this massive power, how do you use it responsibly? When do you intervene? Those are the big questions.

In comics, we're all weird together. I can go to a comics convention and not stand out, even though I'm the only woman in a headscarf there, because the guy next to me has a beard and a Sailor Moon costume.