I can't imagine writing a book without some strong female characters, unless that was a demand of the setting.

William Gibson

William Gibson

Profession: Author
Nationality: American

Some suggestions for you :

I think with one exception I've never changed an opening sentence after a book was completed.

I'm always interested in the spooky repurposing of everyday things.

Whenever I read a contemporary literary novel that describes the world we're living in, I wait for the science fiction tools to come out. Because they have to - the material demands it.

The history of the past, a hundred years from now, won't be the history of the past that we learned in school because much more will have been revealed, and adjectives we can't even imagine will have been brought to bear on what we did learn in school.

If I write something set 60 years in the future, I am going to have to explain how humanity got there, and that's becoming quite a big job.

Language is to the mind more than light is to the eye.

If I'm practicing making up what the characters will do, it's never good. In fact, when I catch myself doing that, I try to get rid of that section, and try and let them start making the decisions.

The future has already arrived. It's just not evenly distributed yet.

And, for an instant, she stared directly into those soft blue eyes and knew, with an instinctive mammalian certainty, that the exceedingly rich were no longer even remotely human.

All we really have when we pretend to write about the future is the moment in which we are writing. That's why every imagined future obsoletes like an ice cream melting on the way back from the corner store.

I started with Apple, in a pre-Windows era when PCs seemed to involve more of a learning curve. But the fact that I'm yet to acquire so much as a single virus still seems a very good thing.

I don't have to write about the future. For most people, the present is enough like the future to be pretty scary.

I don't generate a storyline and then fill it out in the course of writing. The story actually generates in the course of the writing. It's one of the reasons I've never been comfortable doing screenplays, because in order to get the contract for the screenplay, you have to sit down and tell them what's going to happen.

It's impossible to move, to live, to operate at any level without leaving traces, bits, seemingly meaningless fragments of personal information.