I think the least important thing about science fiction for me is its predictive capacity.

William Gibson

William Gibson

Profession: Author
Nationality: American

Some suggestions for you :

In the early '80s, I happened to find myself in the vicinity of people who would work for Microsoft five years later.

Cyberspace. A consensual hallucination experienced daily by billions of legitimate operators, in every nation, by children being taught mathematical concepts.

Why shouldn't we give our teachers a license to obtain software, all software, any software, for nothing? Does anyone demand a licensing fee, each time a child is taught the alphabet?

I can't imagine writing a book without some strong female characters, unless that was a demand of the setting.

I think that technologies are morally neutral until we apply them. It's only when we use them for good or for evil that they become good or evil.

All my life I've encountered people who were obsessed with one particular class of object or experience, who were constantly pursuing that thing. Since I was a little kid, I hadn't afforded myself the opportunity, I guess, to have a hobby.

Science fiction writers aren't fortune tellers. Fortune tellers are fakes.

I'm interested in how people all over the world array themselves and go forth in the morning to do whatever they have to do to make a living.

I'm often saddened and dismayed to see myself portrayed as either a Luddite or as a raving technophile. I've always thought that my job was to be as anthropologically neutral about emerging technologies as possible.

I don't begin a novel with a shopping list - the novel becomes my shopping list as I write it.

Dreaming in public is an important part of our job description, as science writers, but there are bad dreams as well as good dreams. We're dreamers, you see, but we're also realists, of a sort.

Occasionally if I look back at something I've written I'll find one of those that I don't understand, but that's a bad thing - the unconscious has dealt me a bad hand.

I grew up in southwestern Virginia. I was born in South Carolina, but only because my parents had a vacation cabin or something there on the beach. I was like a summer baby. But I did grow up in the South. I grew up in serious, serious Appalachia, in a very small town.

When I wrote 'Neuromancer', I had a list in my head of all the things the future was assumed to be which it would not be in the book I was about to write. In a sense, I intended 'Neuromancer', among other things, to be a critique of all the aspects of science fiction that no longer satisfied me.