Great Groups need to know that the person at the top will fight like a tiger for them.

Warren G. Bennis

Warren G. Bennis

Profession: Author
Nationality: American

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One of the best teaching experiences Ed Schein and I had when we were teaching at MIT in the 1960s was inventing a course on leadership through film.

The primary goal of management education was, as originally conceived, to impart knowledge that could be applied to a variety of real-world business situations.

The manager has his eye on the bottom line; the leader has his eye on the horizon.

The most dangerous leadership myth is that leaders are born – that there is a genetic factor to leadership. This myth asserts that people simply either have certain charismatic qualities or not. That's nonsense; in fact, the opposite is true. Leaders are made rather than born.

How can we educators claim credit for understanding, let alone teaching, the 'global mind' without a single course on the impact of religion on every day life?

Leaders keep their eyes on the horizon, not just on the bottom line.

I wanted the influence. In the end I wasn't very good at being a president. I looked out of the window and thought that the man cutting the lawn actually seemed to have more control over what he was doing.

Our tendency to create heroes rarely jibes with the reality that most nontrivial problems require collective solutions.

You need people who can walk their companies into the future rather than back them into the future.

The manager asks how and when; the leader asks what and why.

The manager accepts the status quo; the leader challenges it.

Learning in a face-to-face human community, as humans have evolved to do over hundreds of thousands of years, may always be the ideal - especially in an endeavor that is as relationship-driven as business.

As my blog editor knows all too well, I wasn't all that keen to enter the blogosphere world.

People who cannot invent and reinvent themselves must be content with borrowed postures, secondhand ideas, fitting in instead of standing out.