The manager accepts the status quo; the leader challenges it.

Warren G. Bennis

Warren G. Bennis

Profession: Author
Nationality: American

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I wanted the influence. In the end I wasn't very good at being a president. I looked out of the window and thought that the man cutting the lawn actually seemed to have more control over what he was doing.

Great things are accomplished by talented people who believe they will accomplish them.

Taking charge of your own learning is a part of taking charge of your life, which is the sine qua non in becoming an integrated person.

Find the appropriate balance of competing claims by various groups of stakeholders. All claims deserve consideration but some claims are more important than others.

Leaders know the importance of having someone in their lives who will unfailingly and fearlessly tell them the truth.

Success in management requires learning as fast as the world is changing.

Learning options will indeed mushroom for business students and leaders, but it will take prudence and shrewdness to find and utilize the best option.

Our tendency to create heroes rarely jibes with the reality that most nontrivial problems require collective solutions.

Leaders must encourage their organizations to dance to forms of music yet to be heard.

The manager has a short-range view; the leader has a long-range perspective.

One of the best teaching experiences Ed Schein and I had when we were teaching at MIT in the 1960s was inventing a course on leadership through film.

There are two ways of being creative. One can sing and dance. Or one can create an environment in which singers and dancers flourish.

Most regular, two-year MBA programs provide both experience and the capacity to link together the essential elements of management such as finance, marketing, organizational behavior, and operations.

Good leaders make people feel that they're at the very heart of things, not at the periphery.