I have always detested any departure from reality, an attitude which I relate to my mother's poor mental health.

Jean Piaget

Jean Piaget

Profession: Psychologist
Nationality: Swiss

Some suggestions for you :

I engage my subjects in conversation, patterned after psychiatric questioning, with the aim of discovering something about the reasoning underlying their right but especially their wrong answers.

In other words, knowledge of the external world begins with an immediate utilisation of things, whereas knowledge of self is stopped by this purely practical and utilitarian contact.

One of the most striking things one finds about the child under 7-8 is his extreme assurance on all subjects.

Before playing with his equals, the child is influenced by his parents. He is subjected from his cradle to a multiplicity of regulations, and even before language he becomes conscious of certain obligations.

I always like to think on a problem before reading about it.

Intelligence is what you use when you don't know what to do: when neither innateness nor learning has prepared you for the particular situation.

Our problem, from the point of view of psychology and from the point of view of genetic epistemology, is to explain how the transition is made from a lower level of knowledge to a level that is judged to be higher.

Scientific knowledge is in perpetual evolution; it finds itself changed from one day to the next.

Childish egocentrism is, in its essence, an inability to differentiate between the ego and the social environment.

To accustom the infant to get out of its own difficulties or to calm it by rocking it may be to lay the foundations of a good or of a bad disposition.

Logical activity is not the whole of intelligence. One can be intelligent without being particularly logical.

On the one hand, there are individual actions such as throwing, pushing, touching, rubbing. It is these individual actions that give rise most of the time to abstraction from objects.

With regard to moral rules, the child submits more or less completely in intention to the rules laid down for him, but these, remaining, as it were, external to the subject's conscience, do not really transform his conduct.

Scientific thought, then, is not momentary; it is not a static instance; it is a process.