Rhetoric then may be defined as the faculty of discovering the possible means of persuasion in reference to any subject whatever.

Aristotle

Aristotle

Profession: Philosopher
Nationality: Greek

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Virtue is a greater good than honour; and one might perhaps accordingly suppose that virtue rather than honour is the end of the political life.

Probable impossibilities are to be preferred to improbable possibilities.

But in all cases we must guard most carefully against what is pleasant, and pleasure itself, because we are not impartial judges of it.

It is the mark of an educated man to look for precision in each class of things just so far as the nature of the subject admits; it is evidently equally foolish to accept probable reasoning from a mathematician and to demand from a rhetorician demonstrative proofs.

Now we say that (a) the continuous is one or that (b) the indivisible is one, or (c) things are said to be ‘one', when their essence is one and the same, as ‘liquor' and ‘drink'. If (a) their One is one in the sense of continuous, it is many, (10) for the continuous is divisible ad infinitum.

Think as the wise men think, but talk like the simple people do.

Happiness does not consist in pastimes and amusements but in virtuous activities.

The happy life is thought to be one of excellence; now an excellent life requires exertion, and does not consist in amusement. If Eudaimonia, or happiness, is activity in accordance with excellence, it is reasonable that it should be in accordance with the highest excellence; and this will be that of the best thing in us.

In all things of nature there is something of the marvelous.

Again men in general desire the good and not merely what their fathers had.

The smallest number, strictly speaking, is two.

If, then, ‘substance' is not attributed to anything, but other things are attributed to it, how does ‘substance' mean what is rather than what is not?

Men are swayed more by fear than by reverence.

Therefore the activity of God, which surpasses all others in blessedness, must be contemplative; and of human activities, therefore, that which is most akin to this must be most of the nature of happiness.