My style of writing is very diffrent from yours.

Jane Austen

Jane Austen

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

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I certainly have not the talent which some people possess," said Darcy, "of conversing easily with those I have never seen before. I cannot catch their tone of conversation, or appear interested in their concerns, as I often see done.

The gentleness, modesty, and sweetness of her character were warmly expatiated on; that sweetness which makes so essential a part of every woman's worth in the judgment of man, that though he sometimes loves where it is not, he can never believe it absent.

Affectation of candour is common enough—one meets with it everywhere. But to be candid without ostentation or design— to take the good of everybody's character and make it still better, and say nothing of the bad—belongs to you alone.

Yes. these four evenings have enabled them to ascertain that they both like Vingt-un better than Commerce.

It stood the record of many sensations of pain, once severe, but now softened; and of some instances of relenting feeling, some breathings of friendship and reconciliation, which could never be looked for again, and which could never cease to be dear. She left it all behind her, all but the recollection that such things had been.

The past, present, and future, were all equally in gloom.

I consider a country-dance as an emblem of marriage. Fidelity and complaisance are the principal duties of both; and those men who do not choose to dance or marry themselves, have no business with the partners or wives of their neighbours.

The employment of mind and dissipation of unpleasant ideas which only reading could produce made her thankfully turn to a book.

Oh! what a silly Thing is Woman! How vain, how unreasonable!

Words were insufficient for the elevation of his [Mr Collins'] feelings; and he was obliged to walk about the room, while Elizabeth tried to unite civility and truth in a few short sentences.

I could not excuse a man's having more music than love—more ear than eye—a more acute sensibility to fine sounds than to my feelings.

Did not you? I did for you. But that is one great difference between us. Compliments always take you by surprise, and me never.

If there are young ladies in the world at her time of life more dull of fancy and more careless of pleasing, I know them not and never wish to know them.

To come with a well-informed mind is to come with an inability of administering to the vanity of others, which a sensible person would always wish to avoid. A woman especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing anything, should conceal it as well as she can.