As regards moral courage, then, it is not so much that the public schools support it feebly, as that they suppress it firmly.

Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

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It is a sign of the frailty of contemporary Christianity, rather than its strength, that we often do not begin to question until the megaphone of suffering has awakened us from our sleep.

All other societies die finally and with dignity. We die daily.

Thrift is poetic because it is creative.

A joke is by its nature a protest against sense. It is no good attacking nonsense for being successfully nonsensical.

We shall have gone deeper than the deeps of heaven and grown older than the oldest angels before we feel, even in its first faint vibrations, the everlasting violence of that double passion with which God hates and loves the world.

In our time the blasphemies are threadbare. Pessimism is now patently, as it always was essentially, more commonplace than piety. Profanity is now more than an affectation — it is a convention. The curse against God is Exercise 1 in the primer of minor poetry.

It may not be automatic necessity that makes all daisies alike; it may be that God makes every daisy separately, but has never got tired of making them. It may be that He has the eternal appetite of infancy; for we have sinned and grown old, and our Father is younger than we.

For when we cease to worship God, we do not worship nothing, we worship anything.

Men did not love Rome because she was great. She was great because they had loved her.

No ideal will remain long enough to be realised, or even partly realised. The modern young man will never change his environment; for he will always change his mind.

Metaphysics is the only thoroughly emotional thing.

Man seems to be capable of great virtues but not of small virtues; capable of defying his torturer but not of keeping his temper.

The human race, to which so many of my readers belong...

The mind that finds its way to wild places is the poet's; but the mind that never finds its way back is the lunatic's.