Happiness does not consist in amusement. In fact, it would be strange if our end were amusement, and if we were to labor and suffer hardships all our life long merely to amuse ourselves.... The happy life is regarded as a life in conformity with virtue. It is a life which involves effort and is not spent in amusement....

Aristotle

Aristotle

Profession: Philosopher
Nationality: Greek


Happiness does not consist in amusement. In fact, it would be strange if our end were amusement, and.. Aristotle

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Justice is the loveliest and health is the best, but the sweetest to obtain is the heart's desire.

Temperance is a mean with regard to pleasures.

It is the mark of an educated man to look for precision in each class of things just so far as the nature of the subject admits; it is evidently equally foolish to accept probable reasoning from a mathematician and to demand from a rhetorician demonstrative proofs.

When people are friends, they have no need of justice, but when they are just, they need friendship in addition.

Different men seek ... happiness in different ways and by different means.

It is clearly better that property should be private, but the use of it common; and the special business of the legislator is to create in men this benevolent disposition.

It is therefore not of small moment whether we are trained from adulthood in one set of habits or another; on the contrary it is of very great, or rather supreme importance.

Again men in general desire the good and not merely what their fathers had.

Again, Practical Wisdom and Excellence of the Moral character are very closely united; since the Principles of Practical Wisdom are in accordance with the Moral Virtues and these are right when they accord with Practical Wisdom.

It is just that we should be grateful, not only to those with whose views we may agree, but also to those who have expressed more superficial views; for these also contributed something, by developing before us the powers of thought.

Greatness of spirit is accompanied by simplicity and sincerity.

Each man judges correctly those matters with which he is acquainted; it is of these that he is a competent critic.

No excellent soul is exempt from a mixture of madness.

In poverty and other misfortunes of life, true friends are a sure refuge. The young they keep out of mischief; to the old they are a comfort and aid in their weakness, and those in the prime of life they incite to noble deeds.