Trust your instinct to the end, though you can render no reason.

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Ralph Waldo Emerson

Profession: Poet
Nationality: American


Trust your instinct to the end, though you can render no reason. Ralph Waldo Emerson

Some suggestions for you :

We cannot approach beauty. Its nature is like opaline doves'-neck lustres, hovering and evanescent. Herein it resembles the most excellent things, which all have this rainbow character, defying all attempts at appropriation and use.

It was high counsel that I once heard given to a young person: Always do what you are afraid to do.

Great men are they who see that spiritual is stronger than any material force, that thoughts rule the world.

Society we must have; but let it be society, and not exchanging news or eating from the same dish. Is it society to sit in one of your chairs? I cannot go to the houses of my nearest relatives, because I do not wish to be alone. Society exists by chemical affinity, and not otherwise.

But man postpones or remembers; he does not live in the present, but with reverted eye laments the past, or, heedless of the riches that surround him, stands on tiptoe to foresee the future.

Belief consists in accepting the affirmations of the soul; Unbelief, in denying them.

The end of the human race will be that it will eventually die of civilization.

If you are true, but not in the same truth with me, cleave to your companions; I will seek my own. I do this not selfishly, but humbly and truly. It is alike your interest, and mine, and all men's, however long we have dwelt in lies, to live in truth.

The soul environs itself with friends, that it may enter into a grander self-acquaintance or solitude; and it goes alone for a season, that it may exalt its conversation or society.

Vast spaces of nature; the Atlantic Ocean, the South Sea; vast intervals of time, years, centuries, are of no account. This which I think and feel, underlay that former state of life and circumstances, as it does underlie my present, and will always circumstance, and what is called life, and what is called death.

Speak your latent conviction. . . Else tomorrow a stranger will say with masterly good sense precisely what we have thought and felt all the time, and we shall be forced to take with shame our own opinion from another.

Friendship should be surrounded with ceremonies and respects, and not crushed into corners. Friendship requires more time than poor busy men can usually command.

If you put a chain around the neck of a slave, the other end fastens itself around your own.

Judge of your natural character by what you do in your dreams.