A map was a fine thing to study when you were disposed to think of something else, being made up of names that would turn into a chime if you went back upon them.

George Eliot

George Eliot

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

Some suggestions for you :

A bride and bridegroom, surrounded by all the appliances of wealth, hurried through the day by the whirl of society, filling their solitary moments with hastily-snatched caresses, are prepared for their future life together as the novice is prepared for the cloister—by experiencing its utmost contrast.

It is the favourite stratagem of our passions to sham a retreat, and to turn sharp round upon us at the moment we have made up our minds that the day is our own.

There are characters which are continually creating collisions and nodes for themselves in dramas which nobody is prepared to act with them. Their susceptibilities will clash against objects that remain innocently quiet.

That's what a man wants in a wife, mostly; he wants to make sure one fool tells him he's wise.

When one sees a perfect woman, one never thinks of her attributes–one is conscious of her presence.

I would rather not be engaged. When people are engaged, they begin to think of being married soon, and I should like everything to go on for a long while just as it is.

But we all know the wag's definition of a philanthropist: a man whose charity increases directly as the square of the distance.

Perhaps we don't always discriminate between sense and nonsense.

When our indignation is borne in submissive silence, we are apt to feel twinges of doubt afterwards as to our own generosity, if.

If Art does not enlarge men's sympathies, it does nothing morally.

Her profile as well as her stature and bearing seemed to gain the more dignity from her plain garments, which by the side of provincial fashion gave her the impressiveness of a fine quotation from the Bible,—or from one of our elder poets,—in a paragraph of to-day's newspaper.

Consequences are unpitying.

As to his religious notions—why, as Voltaire said, incantations will destroy a flock of sheep if administered with a certain quantity of arsenic. I look for the man who will bring the arsenic, and don't mind about his incantations.

The world is full of hopeful analogies and handsome, dubious eggs, called possibilities.