For at least two thirds of our miseries spring from human stupidity, human malice and those great motivators and justifiers of malice and stupidity, idealism, dogmatism and proselytizing zeal on behalf of religious or political idols.

Aldous Huxley

Aldous Huxley

Profession: Novelist
Nationality: British

Some suggestions for you :

When we see a rose, we immediately say, rose. We do not say, I see a roundish mass of delicately shaded reds and pinks. We immediately pass from the actual experience to the concept.

Ordinary men, we have seen, are not much interested in any political problems which do not immediately affect themselves.

Democracy is, among other things, the ability to say 'no' to the boss. But a man cannot say 'no' to the boss, unless he is sure of being able to eat when the boss's favour has been withdrawn.

The firelight touches and transfigures her face, and we see, concretely illustrated, the impossible paradox and supreme truth—that perception is (or at least can be, ought to be) the same as Revelation, that Reality shines out of every appearance, that the One is totally, infinitely present in all particulars.

All my thoughts are second thoughts.

Feeling lurks in that interval of time between desire and its consummation.

The sound-track roll was unwinding itself in Synthetic Anti-Riot Speech Number Two.

What is absurd and monstrous about war is that men who have no personal quarrel should be trained to murder one another in cold blood.

The most valuable of all education is the ability to make yourself do the thing you have to do, when it has to be done, whether you like it or not.

Wherever the choice has had to be made between the man of reason and the madman, the world has unhesitatingly followed the madman.

The vast majority of human beings are not interested in reason or satisfied with what it teaches.

From their experience or from the recorded experience of others (history), men learn only what their passions and their metaphysical prejudices allow them to learn.

The most shocking fact about war is that its victims and its instruments are individual human beings, and that these individual beings are condemned by the monstrous conventions of politics to murder or be murdered in quarrels not their own.

But truth's a menace, science is a public danger.