No man is such a legalist as the good Secularist.

Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

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Would you be so obliging as to tell me whose house this is?' 'Mine,' said the burglar, 'May I present you to my wife?

An historic institution, which never went right, is really quite much of a miracle as an institution that cannot go wrong.

Her finger-nails were painted five different colours, looking like the paints in a child's paintbox; and she was as innocent as a child.

Art consists of limitation. The most beautiful part of every picture is the frame.

But one of the strange marks of the strength of Christianity is that, since it came, no pagan in our civilisation has been able to be really human.

Cheerfulness without humour is a very trying thing.

The duty of the artist lies in keeping alive a sense of wonder in the world.

Pimlico would attire herself as a woman does when she is loved. For decoration is not given to hide horrible things; but to decorate things already adorable.

Central Christian theology (sufficiently summarized in the Apostles' Creed) is the best root of energy and sound ethics.

The society had a vast number of ceremonies and observances, but it had no history and no object; that was where it was so very aristocratic.

For the perplexity of life arises from there being too many interesting things in it for us to be interested properly in any of them; what we call its triviality is really the tag-ends of numberless tales; ordinary and unmeaning existence is like ten thousand thrilling detective stories mixed up with a spoon.

Through all this ordeal his root horror had been isolation, and there are no words to express the abyss between isolation and having one ally. It may be conceded to the mathematicians that four is twice two. But two is not twice one; two is two thousand times one.

A child has an ingrained fancy for coal, not for the gross materialistic reason that it builds up fires by which we cook and are warmed, but for the infinitely nobler and more abstract reason that it blacks his fingers.

It is true that a man (a silly man) might make change itself his object or ideal. But as an ideal, change itself becomes unchangeable. If the change-worshipper wishes to estimate his own progress, he must be sternly loyal to the ideal of change; he must not begin to flirt gaily with the ideal of monotony. Progress itself cannot progress.