Men are strong so long as they represent a strong idea,they become powerless when they oppose it.

Sigmund Freud

Sigmund Freud

Profession: Psychologist
Nationality: Austrian


Men are strong so long as they represent a strong idea,they become powerless when they oppose it. Sigmund Freud

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As regards intellectual work it remains a fact, indeed, that great decisions in the realm of thought and momentous discoveries and solutions of problems are only possible to an individual, working in solitude.

No mortal can keep a secret. If the lips are silent, he chatters with his fingertips; betrayal oozes out of him at every pore.

The view is often defended that sciences should be built up on clear and sharply defined basal concepts. In actual fact no science, not even the most exact, begins with such definitions. The true beginning of scientific activity consists rather in describing phenomena and then in proceeding to group, classify and correlate them.

I do not in the least underestimate bisexuality. . . I expect it to provide all further enlightenment.

Dream-displacement and dream-condensation are the two foremen in charge of the dream-work, and we may put the shaping of our dreams down mainly to their activity.

You wanted to kill your father in order to be your father yourself. Now you are your father, but a dead father.

The paranoid is never entirely mistaken.

No neurotic harbors thoughts of suicide which are not murderous impulses against others redirected upon himself.

From error to error one discovers the entire truth.

What is common in all these dreams is obvious. They completely satisfy wishes excited during the day which remain unrealized. They are simply and undisguisedly realizations of wishes.

The weakness of my position does not imply a strengthening of yours.

America is a mistake, a giant mistake.

The ego refuses to be distressed by the provocations of reality, to let itself be compelled to suffer. It insists that it cannot be affected by the traumas of the external world; it shows, in fact, that such traumas are no more than occasions for it to gain pleasure.

Theoretical considerations require that what is to-day the object of a phobia must at one time in the past have been the source of a high degree of pleasure.