Avarice, the spur of industry, is so obstinate a passion, and works its way through so many real dangers and difficulties, that it is not likely to be scared by an imaginary danger, which is so small that it scarcely admits of calculation.

David Hume

David Hume

Profession: Philosopher
Nationality: Scottish

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Nothing endears so much a friend as sorrow for his death. The pleasure of his company has not so powerful an influence.

Belief is nothing but a more vivid, lively, forcible, firm, steady conception of an object, than what the imagination alone is ever able to attain.

Any person seasoned with a just sense of the imperfections of natural reason, will fly to revealed truth with the greatest avidity.

A propensity to hope and joy is real riches; one to fear and sorrow real poverty.

He is happy whom circumstances suit his temper; but he Is more excellent who suits his temper to any circumstance.

The chief benefit, which results from philosophy, arises in an indirect manner, and proceeds more from its secret, insensible influence, than from its immediate application.

The heights of popularity and patriotism are still the beaten road to power and tyranny.

The life of man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster.

Every wise, just, and mild government, by rendering the condition of its subjects easy and secure, will always abound most in people, as well as in commodities and riches.

Generally speaking, the errors in religion are dangerous; those in philosophy only ridiculous.

There ambition can cover its enterprises, even to the person himself, under the appearance of principle, it is the most incurable and inflexibl eof passions.

To be a philosophical sceptic is, in a man of letters, the first and most essential to being a sound, believing Christian.

Beauty, whether moral or natural, is felt, more properly than perceived.

Nothing is more surprising than the easiness with which the many are governed by the few.