Accordingly, the poet should prefer probable impossibilities to improbable possibilities.

Aristotle

Aristotle

Profession: Philosopher
Nationality: Greek

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Even a woman may be good, and also a slave; though the woman may be said to be an inferior being, and the slave quite worthless.

The noble things and the just things, which the political art examines, admit of much dispute and variability, such that they are held to exist by law11 alone and not by nature.

Lawgivers make the citizens food by training them in habits of right action - this is the aim of all legislation, and if it fails to do this it is a failure.

With regard to excellence it is not enough to know but we must try to have and use it.

We give up leisure in order that we may have leisure, just as we go to war in order that we may have peace.

All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reason, passion, and desire.

And this term usury [τóκoς], which means the birth of money from money, is applied to the breeding of money because the offspring resembles the parent. Wherefore of all modes of making money this is the most unnatural.

A courageous person is one who faces fearful things as he ought and as reason directs for the sake of what is noble.

Comedy aims at representing men as worse, Tragedy as better than in actual life.

For it is owing to their wonder that men both now begin and at first began to philosophize.

Anybody can become angry — that is easy, but to be angry with the right person and to the right degree and at the right time and for the right purpose, and in the right way — that is not within everybody's power and is not easy.

To enjoy the things we ought and to hate the things we ought has the greatest bearing on excellence of character.

What makes a man a 'sophist' is not his faculty, but his moral purpose.

It is the mark of an educated man to look for precision in each class of things just so far as the nature of the subject admits; it is evidently equally foolish to accept probable reasoning from a mathematician and to demand from a rhetorician demonstrative proofs.