Beware how you give your heart.

Jane Austen

Jane Austen

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

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The commonest, dullest, most threadbare topic might be rendered interesting by the skill of the speaker.

I lay it down as a general rule, Harriet, that if a woman doubts as to whether she should accept a man or not, she certainly ought to refuse him. If she can hesitate as to "'Yes,'" she ought to say "'No'" directly. It is not a state to be safely entered into with doubtful feelings, with half a heart.

Every thing was safe enough, and she smiled over the many anxious feelings she had wasted on the subject.

Follies and nonsense, whims and inconsistencies do divert me, I own, and I laugh at them whenever I can.

What had she to wish for? Nothing, but to grow more worthy of him whose intentions and judgment had been ever so superior to her own.

If any young men come for Mary or Kitty, send them in, for I am quite as leisure.

She regained the street--happy in this, that though much had been forced on her against her will, though she had in fact heard the whole substance of Jane Fairfax's letter, she had been able to escape the letter itself.

She read with an eagerness which hardly left her power of comprehension, and from impatience of knowing what the next sentence might bring, was incapable of attending to the sense of the one before her eyes.

To say that he is unlike Fanny is enough. It implies everything amiable. I love him already.

Yes," replied Darcy, who could contain himself no longer, "but that was when I first knew her; for it is many months since I have considered her as one of the handsomest women of my acquaintance.

The anxiety, which in this state of their attachment must be the portion of Henry and Catherine, and of all who loved either, as to its final event, can hardly extend, I fear, to the bosom of my readers, who will see in the tell-tale compression of the pages before them, that we are all hastening together to perfect felicity.

Alas! (exclaimed I) how am I to avoid those evils I shall never be exposed to?

No, I must keep to my own style and go on in my own way; and though I may never succeed again in that, I am convinced that I should totally fail in any other.

The event had every promise of happiness for her friend. Mr. Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what self-denying, generous friendship.