No man should leave in the universe anything of which he is afraid.

Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Gilbert Keith Chesterton

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

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The perplexity of life arises from their being too many interesting things in it for us to be interested properly in any of them; what we call it's triviality is really the tag-ends of numberless tales; ordinary and unmeaning existence is like ten thousand thrilling detective stories mixed up with a spoon.

Men always attempt to avoid condemning a thing upon merely moral grounds. If I beat my grandmother to death to-morrow in the middle of Battersea Park, you may be perfectly certain that people will say everything about it except the simple and fairly obvious fact that it is wrong.

Meaninglessness does not come from being weary of pain. Meaninglessness comes from being weary of pleasure.

There are two ways of getting home; and one of them is to stay there. The other is to walk round the whole world till we come back to the same place; and I tried to trace such a journey in a story I once wrote.

You say grace before meals. I say grace before I dip the pen in the ink.

Once men sang together round a table in chorus; now one man sings alone, for the absurd reason that he can sing better. If our civilization goes on like this, only one man will laugh, because he can laugh better than the rest.

When once one believes in a creed, one is proud of its complexity, as scientists are proud of the complexity of science. It shows how rich it is in discoveries. If it is right at all, it is a compliment to say that it's elaborately right.

It is not true that we have never been broken. We have been broken upon the wheel. It is not true that we have never descended from these thrones. We have descended into hell. We were complaining of unforgettable miseries even at the very moment when this man entered insolently to accuse us of happiness. I repel the slander; we have not been happy.

So strong is tradition that later generations will dream of what they have never seen.

I had always felt life first as a story...

In the wild events which were to follow this girl had no part at all; he never saw her again until all his tale was over.

The simplification of anything is always sensational.

I did try to found a little heresy of my own; and when I had put the last touches to it, I discovered that it was orthodoxy.

One rationalist had hardly done calling Christianity a nightmare before another began to call it a fool's paradise. This puzzled me; the charges seemed inconsistent.