I do regard her as one who is too modest for the world in general to be aware of half her accomplishments, and too highly accomplished for modesty to be natural of any other woman.

Jane Austen

Jane Austen

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

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But Shakespeare one gets acquainted with without knowing how. It is a part of an Englishman's constitution. His thoughts and beauties are so spread abroad that one touches them everywhere; one is intimate with him by instinct.

He was not handsome, and his manners required intimacy to make them pleasing.

Once so much to each other! Now nothing!

But Mr. Bennet was not of a disposition to seek comfort for the disappointment which his own imprudence had brought on in any of those pleasures which too often console the unfortunate for their folly or their vice.

She felt that she could so much more depend upon the sincerity of those who sometimes looked or said a careless or a hasty thing, than of those whose presence of mind never varied, whose tongue never slipped.

Time, time will heal the wound.

They agreed that Mrs. Bennet should only hear of the departure of the family, without.

Where I have a regard, I always think a person well-looking.

Certainly, sir; and it has the advantage also of being in vogue amongst the less polished societies of the world. Every savage can dance.

I am worn out with civility.

I write only to bid you Farewell. The spell is removed; I see you as you are.

I am going to-morrow where I shall find a man who has not one agreeable quality, who has neither manner nor sense to recommend him. Stupid men are the only ones worth knowing, after all.

I suppose you have heard of the handsome letter Mr. Frank Churchill had written to Mrs. Weston? I understand it was a very handsome letter, indeed. Mr. Woodhouse told me of it. Mr. Woodhouse saw the letter, and he says he never saw such a handsome letter in his life.

My playing is no more like her's, than a lamp is like sunshine.