Wit is educated insolence.

Aristotle

Aristotle

Profession: Philosopher
Nationality: Greek

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The wise man does not expose himself needlessly to danger, since there are few things for which he cares sufficiently; but he is willing, in great crises, to give even his life – knowing that under certain conditions it is not worthwhile to live.

Now the proofs furnished by the speech are of three kinds. The first depends upon the moral character of the speaker, the second upon putting the hearer into a certain frame of mind, the third upon the speech itself, in so far as it proves or seems to prove.

The young are permanently in a state resembling intoxication.

How many a dispute could have been deflated into a single paragraph if the disputants had dared to define their terms!

Between friends there is no need of justice.

Political society exists for the sake of noble actions, and not of mere companionship.

Happiness is an expression of the soul in considered actions.

A sign of this is what happens in our actions, for we delight in contemplating the most accurately made images of the very things that are painful for us to see, such as the forms of the most contemptible insects and of dead bodies.

Yes the truth is that men's ambition and their desire to make money are among the most frequent causes of deliberate acts of injustice.

Lawgivers make the citizens food by training them in habits of right action - this is the aim of all legislation, and if it fails to do this it is a failure.

The greatest crimes are not those committed for the sake of necessity but those committed for the sake of superfluity. One does not become a tyrant to avoid exposure to the cold.

By myth I mean the arrangement of the incidents.

All human actions have one or more of these seven causes: chance, nature, compulsion, habit, reason, passion, and desire.

There are, then, these three means of effecting persuasion. The man who is to be in command of them must, it is clear, be able (1) to reason logically, (2) to understand human character and goodness in their various forms, and (3) to understand the emotions-that is, to name them and.