The little light he possessed spread its beams so narrowly, that frustrated belief was a curtain broad enough to create for him the blackness of night.

George Eliot

George Eliot

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

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Language gives a fuller image, which is all the better for beings vague. After all, the true seeing is within.

Certainly the determining acts of her life were not ideally beautiful. They were the mixed result of young and novel impulse struggling amidst the conditions of an imperfect social state, in which great feelings will often take the aspect of error, and great faith the aspect of illusion.

Having made his clerical toilet with due care in the morning, he was prepared only for those amenities of life which were suited to the well-adjusted stiff cravat of the period, and to a mind weighted with unpublished matter.

To most mortals there is a stupidity which is unendurable and a stupidity which is altogether acceptable — else, indeed, what would become of social bonds?

She was no longer wrestling with the grief, but could sit down with it as a lasting companion and make it a sharer in her thoughts.

Genius consisting neither in self-conceit nor in humilty, but in a power to making or do, not anything in general, but something in particular.

Pride helps us; and pride is not a bad thing when it only urges us to hide our own hurts—not to hurt others.

This was the Reverend Edward Casaubon, noted in the county as a man of profound learning, understood for many years to be engaged on a great work concerning religious history; also as a man of wealth enough to give lustre to his piety, and having views of his own which were to be more clearly ascertained on the publication of his book.

I flutter all ways, and fly in none.

A character at unity with itself –that performs what it intends, subdues every counteracting impulse, and has no visions beyond the distinctly possible –is strong by its very negations.

Any coward can fight a battle when he's sure of winning; but give me the man who has pluck to fight when he's sure of losing. That's my way, sir; and there are many victories worse than a defeat.

People who seem to enjoy their ill-temper have a way of keeping it in fine condition by inflicting privations on themselves.

Having made this rather lofty comparison I am less uneasy in calling attention to the existence of low people by whose interference, however little we may like it, the course of the world is very much determined.

Solomon's Proverbs, I think, have omitted to say, that as the sore palate findeth grit, so an uneasy consciousness heareth innuendoes.