With regard to excellence it is not enough to know but we must try to have and use it.

Aristotle

Aristotle

Profession: Philosopher
Nationality: Greek

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To give a satisfactory decision as to the truth it is necessary to be rather an arbitrator than a party to the dispute.

Hence while in respect of its substance and the definition that states what it really is in essence virtue is the observance of the mean, in point of excellence and rightness it is an extreme.

Happiness does not consist in amusement. In fact, it would be strange if our end were amusement, and if we were to labor and suffer hardships all our life long merely to amuse ourselves.... The happy life is regarded as a life in conformity with virtue. It is a life which involves effort and is not spent in amusement....

All thinkers then agree in making the contraries principles, both those who describe the All as one and unmoved (for even Parmenides treats hot and cold as principles under the names of fire and earth) and those too who use the rare and the dense.

For there are two reasons why human beings face danger calmly: they may have no experience of it, or they may have means to deal with it: thus when in danger at sea people may feel confident about what will happen either because they have no experience of bad weather, or because their experience gives them the means of dealing with it.

Wise men speak when they have something to say, fools speak because they have to say something.

Man is his desire.

Wit is educated insolence.

And it will often happen that a man with wealth in the form of coined money will not have enough to eat; and what a ridiculous kind of wealth is that which even in abundance will not save you from dying with hunger!

Civil strife is caused not only by inequality of property, but also by inequality of honors.

The simply complete thing, then, is that which is always chosen for itself and never on account of something else.

Nature abhors a vacuum.

By the mean of the thing I denote a point equally distant from either extreme, which is one and the same for everybody; by the mean relative to us, that amount which is neither too much nor too little, and this is not one and the same for everybody.

Comedy has had no history, because it was not at first treated seriously.