To this it must be added, that life in a wig is to a large class of people much more terrifying and impressive than life with its own head of hair ...

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens

Profession: Novelist
Nationality: British

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Little Red Riding Hood was my first love. I felt that if I could have married Little Red Riding Hood, I should have known perfect bliss.

The terrible announcement that the baby had been taken in the act of putting a doll's frying-pan into his mouth, and was more than suspected of having swallowed a fictitious turkey, glued on a wooden platter! The immense relief of finding this a false alarm! The joy, and gratitude, and ecstasy!

Why is it that we can better bear to part in spirit than in body, and while we have the fortitude to act farewell, have not the nerve to say it?

It opens the lungs, washes the countenance, exercises the eyes, and softens down the temper; so cry away.

For certain, neither of them sees a happy Present, as the gate opens and closes, and one goes in, and the other goes away.

It is a dangerous thing to see anything in the sphere of a vain blusterer, before the vain blusterer sees it himself.

I believe, sir,' said Richard Swiveller, taking his pen out of his mouth, 'that you desire to look at these apartments. They are very charming apartments, sir. They command an uninterrupted view of - of over the way, and they are within one minute's walk of - of the corner of the street.

He lived in chambers that had once belonged to his deceased partner. They were a gloomy suite of rooms, in a lowering pile of building up a yard, where it had so little business to be, that one could scarcely help fancying it must have run there when it was a young house, playing at hide-and-seek with other houses, and forgotten the way out again.

The last burst carried the mail to the summit of the hill.

It was a maxim with Foxey- our revered father, gentlemen - 'Always suspect everybody.

And as mere human knowledge can split a ray of light and analyse the manner of its composition, so, sublimer intelligences may read in the feeble shining of this earth of ours, every thought and act, every vice and virtue, of every responsible creature on it.

May not the complaint, that common people are above their station, often take its rise in the fact of uncommon people being below theirs?

And then I looked at the stars, and considered how awful it would be for a man to turn his face up to them as he froze to death, and see no help or pity in all the glittering multitude.

There was a piece of ornamental water immediately below the parapet, on the other side, into which Mr. James Harthouse had a very strong inclination to pitch Mr. Thomas Gradgrind Junior.