The only sin in the world is ignorance.

Henry David Thoreau

Henry David Thoreau

Profession: Author
Nationality: American


The only sin in the world is ignorance. Henry David Thoreau

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I find it so difficult to dispose of the few facts which to me are significant, that I hesitate to burden my attention with those which are insignificant.

This is the frost coming out of the ground; this is Spring. It precedes the green and flowery spring, as mythology precedes regular poetry.

Here is life, an experiment to a great extent untried by me.

I would rather ride on earth in an ox cart, with a free circulation, than go to heaven in the fancy car of an excursion train and breathe a malaria all the way...But lo! men have become the tools of their tools...We have built for this world a family mansion, and for the next a family tomb.

It is not enought to be busy, so are the ants. The question is: What are we busy about?

I believe that every man who has ever been earnest to preserve his higher or poetic faculties in the best condition has been particularly inclined to abstain from animal food, and from much food of any kind.

The same sun which ripens my beans illumines at once a system of earths like ours. If I had remembered this it would have prevented some mistakes.

A thoroughbred business man cannot enter heartily upon the business of life without first looking into his accounts.

We are more anxious to speak than to be heard.

Is is not enough to be busy… The question is: what are we busy about?

Here is life, an experiment to a great extent untried by me; but it does not avail me that they have tried it.

Those things for which the most money is demanded are never the things which the student most wants. Tuition, for instance, is an important item in the term bill, while for the far more valuable education which he gets by associating with the most cultivated of his contemporaries no charge is made.

Our moments of inspiration are not lost though we have no particular poem to show for them; for those experiences have left an indelible impression, and we are ever and anon reminded of them.

Not until we are lost do we begin to understand ourselves.