Company is always cheerful.

Jane Austen

Jane Austen

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

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Yes, vanity is a weakness indeed. But pride—where there is a real superiority of mind, pride will be always under good regulation.

You are too generous to trifle with me.

She loved Anne better than she loved her own abilities.

But remember that the pain of parting from friends will be felt by every body at times, whatever be their education or state.

Cold-hearted Elinor! Oh! Worse than cold-hearted! Ashamed of being otherwise.--Marianne Dashwood.

Catherine hoped at least to pass uncensured through the crowd. As for admiration, it was always very welcome when it came, but she did not depend on it.

But Mrs. John Dashwood was a strong caricature of himself;—more narrow-minded and selfish.

She was stronger alone; and her own good sense so well supported her, that her firmness was as unshaken, her appearance of cheerfulness as invariable, as, with regrets so poignant and so fresh, it was possible for them to be.

She denied none of it aloud, and agreed to none of it in private.

No one can think more highly of the understanding of women than I do. In my opinion, nature has given them so much that they never find it necessary to use more than half.

Her mind was less difficult to develop.

It is not my way to bother my brains with what does not concern me. My notion of things is simple enough. Let me only have the girl I like, say I, with a comfortable house over my head, and what care I for all the rest? Fortune is nothing. I am sure of a good income of my own; and if she had not a penny, why, so much the better.

If he is satisfied with only regretting me, when he might have obtained my affections and hand, I shall soon cease to regret him at all.

Upon my word, Emma, to hear you abusing the reason you have, is almost enough to make me think so too. Better be without sense than misapply it as you do.