A man never lies with more delicious languor under the influence of a passion than when he has persuaded himself that he shall subdue it to-morrow.

George Eliot

George Eliot

Profession: Author
Nationality: British

Some suggestions for you :

The Vicar did feel then as if his share of duties would be easy. But Duty has a trick of behaving unexpectedly — something like a heavy friend whom we have amiably asked to visit us, and who breaks his leg within our gates.

But we all know the wag's definition of a philanthropist: a man whose charity increases directly as the square of the distance.

Perhaps the most delightful friendships are those in which there is much agreement, much disputation, and yet more personal liking.

If we could hear the squirrel's heartbeat, the sound of the grass growing, we should die of that roar.

Excellence encourages one about life generally; it shows the spiritual wealth of the world.

Self-consciousness of the manner is the expensive substitute for simplicity.

It is better - it shall be better with me because I have known you.

The little light he possessed spread its beams so narrowly, that frustrated belief was a curtain broad enough to create for him the blackness of night.

Do we not wile away moments of inanity or fatigued waiting by repeating some trivial movement or sound, until the repetition has bred a want, which is incipient habit?

How can a man's candour be seen in all its lustre unless he has a few failings to talk of? But he had an agreeable confidence that his faults were all of a generous kind—impetuous, arm-blooded, leonine; never crawling, crafty, reptilian.

If you had a table spread for a feast, and was making merry with your friends, you would think it was kind to let me come and sit down and rejoice with you, because you'd think I should like to share those good things; but I should like better to share in your trouble and your labour.

There is no feeling except the extremes of fear and grief that does not find relief in music.

The subtle and varied pains springing from the higher sensibility that accompanies higher culture, are perhaps less pitiable than that dreary absence of impersonal enjoyment and consolation which leaves ruder minds to the perpetual urgent companionship of their own griefs and discontents.

One's self-satisfaction is an untaxed kind of property which it is very unpleasant to find deprecated.