Perfection of character: to live your last day, every day, without frenzy, or sloth, or pretense.

Marcus Aurelius

Marcus Aurelius

Profession: Soldier
Nationality: Roman

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The art of living is more like wrestling than dancing.

And consider this which is near to thee, this boundless abyss of the past and of the future in which all things disappear. How then is he not a fool who is puffed up with such things or plagued about them and makes himself miserable? for they vex him only for a time, and a short time.

Which is recorded of Socrates, that he was able both to abstain from, and to enjoy, those things which many are too weak to abstain from, and cannot enjoy without excess. But to be strong enough both to bear the one and to be sober in the other is the mark of a man who has a perfect and invincible soul.

If they've made a mistake, correct them gently and show them where they went wrong. If you can't do that, then the blame lies with you. Or no one.

It is not the actions of others which trouble us (for those actions are controlled by their governing part), but rather it is our own judgments. Therefore remove those judgments and resolve to let go of your anger, and it will already be gone. How do you let go? By realizing that such actions are not shameful to you.

Anger cannot be dishonest.

The way to peace is to be content with yourself, honor the light of reason within, live in harmony with others, and be grateful to the gods for the universe and your role in it.

He may not be profound, he is always sincere.

This that I am, whatever it be, is mere flesh and a little breath and the ruling Reason.

How ridiculous not to flee from one's own wickedness, which is possible, yet endeavour to flee from another's, which is not.

All things fade and quickly turn to myth.

Anything in any way beautiful derives its beauty from itself and asks nothing beyond itself. Praise is no part of it, for nothing is made worse or better by praise.

Whenever you are about to find fault with someone, ask yourself the following question: What fault of mine most nearly resembles the one I am about to criticize?

Look in, let not either the proper quality, or the true worth of anything pass thee, before thou hast fully it.