If they knew that they are happy, they would be happy.

Fyodor Dostoevsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky

Profession: Author
Nationality: Russian

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Erkel's fate will be lightened. From the moment of his arrest he either maintained silence or did his best to pervert the truth. Not one word of repentance has been extracted from him so far. And yet even in the most severe judges he has awakened a certain sympathy for himself.

If one wants to know any man well, one must consider him gradually and carefully, so as not to fall into error and prejudice, which are very difficult to correct and smooth out later.

I will not and cannot believe that evil is the normal condition of mankind.

In a morbid condition of the brain, dreams often have a singular actuality, vividness, and extraordinary semblance of reality.

But here I should imagine the most terrible part of the whole punishment is, not the bodily pain at all—but the certain knowledge that in an hour, then in ten minutes, then in half a minute, then now—this very instant—your soul must quit your body and that you will no longer be a man—and that this is certain, certain!

And even if only one good memory remains with us in our hearts, that alone may serve some day for our salvation.

Believe to the end, even if all men went astray and you were left the only one faithful; bring your offering even then and praise God in your loneliness.

Alexandra, my eldest, here, plays the piano, or reads or sews; Adelaida paints landscapes and portraits (but never finishes any); and Aglaya sits and does nothing. I don't work too much, either.

A wise man is not afraid to face the truth.

You mustn't think to embarrass them with your witnessing, Your Excellency; they won't be embarrassed.

Man is bound to lie about himself.

Talk nonsense, but talk your own nonsense, and I'll kiss you for it. To go wrong in one's own way is better than to go right in someone else's.

A person's true security consists not in his own persinal, solitary effort, but in the common integrity of mankind.

We sometimes encounter people, even perfect strangers, who begin to interest us at first sight, somehow suddenly, all at once, before a word has been spoken.