Wine is sunlight, held together by water.

Galileo Galilei

Galileo Galilei

Profession: Scientist
Nationality: Italian


Wine is sunlight, held together by water. Galileo Galilei

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Long experience has taught me this about the status of mankind with regard to matters requiring thought: the less people know and understand about them, the more positively they attempt to argue concerning them, while on the other hand to know and understand a multitude of things renders men cautious in passing judgment upon anything new.

To me, a great ineptitude exists on the part of those who would have it that God made the universe more in proportion to the small capacity of their reason than to His immense, His infinite, power.

And, believe me, if I were again beginning my studies, I should follow the advice of Plato and start with mathematics.

With regard to matters requiring thought: the less people know and understand about them, the more positively they attempt to argue concerning them.

Names and attributes must be accommodated to the essence of things, and not the essence to the names, since things come first and names afterwards.

We cannot teach people anything; we can only help them discover it within themselves.

I notice that young men go to the universities in order to become doctors or philosophers or anything, so long as it is a title, and that many go in for those professions who are utterly unfit for them, while others who would be very competent are prevented by business or their daily cares, which keep them away from letters.

It vexes me when they would constrain science by the authority of the Scriptures, and yet do not consider themselves bound to answer reason and experiment.

The greatness and the glory of God shine forth marvelously in all His works, and is to be read above all in the open book of the heavens.

Measure what is measurable, and make measurable what is not so.

See now the power of truth; the same experiment which at first glance seemed to show one thing, when more carefully examined, assures us of the contrary.

By denying scientific principles, one may maintain any paradox.

The nature of the human mind is such that unless it is stimulated by images of things acting upon it from without, all remembrance of them passes easily away.

The fear of infinity is a form of myopia that destroys the possibility of seeing the actual infinite, even though it in its highest form has created and sustains us.