When it comes to investing, you are your own worst enemy.

Barry Ritholtz

Barry Ritholtz

Profession: Author
Nationality: American

Some suggestions for you :

Once you research an idea, you begin to develop a perspective. Writing about anything in public, often in real time, has helped fashion my views.

People forget that although we can pinpoint the price, we can only guess at future earnings. The past isn't much help: It simply tells whether a market was pricey or cheap.

Twitter has become a group conversation of that type that used to take place on trading floors.

I have been a member of the Microsoft-bashing society for quite some time.

It is in your DNA to love a good story. You know, neat tales with heroes and villains and conflicts to resolve. A good story pushes our buttons, is exciting and memorable.

In social media, people cannot build big followings organically unless what they are putting out to the world has value.

Whenever you hear a discussion about the short-term swings in any given stock's price, your immediate thought should be whether it matters to why you are investing.

Many hedge fund managers have become billionaires; perhaps this - plus their reputations as the smartest guys in the room - is why they have captured the investing public's imagination.

Rather than engage in the sort of selective retention that so many investors tend to do and pretend mistakes never happened, I prefer to 'own' them. This allows me to learn from them and, with any luck, avoid making the same errors again.

If I am going to trash others for their dumb predictions, I must at least hold myself to the same sort of accountability.

Outcome is simply the final score: Who won the game; what numbers came up in a roll of the dice; how high did a stock go. Outcome is the result, regardless of the method used to achieve it. It is not controllable.

You can blow on the dice all you want, but whether they come up 'seven' is still a function of random luck.

If you have read me for any length of time, you know I am less than enthralled with much of what passes for financial news.

'Returnless risk' is not how you prepare for a decent retirement.