Social media can be dangerous. People hide behind their computers and write negative things, so I like to keep it about communicating with my fans.

Mo Farah

Mo Farah

Profession: Athlete
Nationality: British

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I want to thank the public, so I have to keep doing what I do, which is keep winning medals for my country.

Records are there to be broken. Lots of people would love to swap their world record for an Olympic medal, but for me, my medals are there forever and ever, and that's what does it for me.

There is so much to discover in Dubai.

In life, if people need help, then we should try and help them out.

It would be great to run around with the family every day, go shopping, take the children out. At my level, though, I can only afford to do that for one week maximum. Otherwise I have to eat, sleep, train - nothing else.

What I do, it's part of my job, but you want to bring your kids up the right way and give them everything - to be there for them and have that connection.

I remember, in 1999, the first time I met Steve Cram, I didn't know who he was. It was only later, on YouTube, I started watching Seb Coe, Ovett. So it's nice to be recognised as one of the best guys in the world.

Every race is different. If you come down the home straight neck and neck, the crowd cheering for you can decide the race.

I'm as much of a human being as the rest of the world. But if I don't train, I don't win. If I don't focus, I don't win. So I don't have a choice: I just have to run.

I used to get called 'Ferrari' when I was a kid because I was always running everywhere.

There's a time in everyone's career where you go, 'Ah, this is hard - how long am I going to have to do this?' But the rewards are so great. Who gets to go on the podium and hear the national anthem? The whole nation singing! Money can't buy you that.

I'm the champion, and to stay ahead, I have to work harder.

There's Kenyan guys who last year or two years ago were running for Kenya, and then they switched to Qatar and Bahrain and other countries. Yes, I do have a problem with that.

The whole reason I moved to the U.S. to be coached by Alberto Salazar is to be able to improve 1 or 2 per cent. I was sick of coming sixth in the world, seventh in the world, and get close to a medal, but not quite there, half-a-second.