I really have this desire to make it known that the Internet exists and YouTubers are important. And not only are YouTubers important, our followings are incredible.

Lilly Singh

Lilly Singh

Profession: Comedian
Nationality: Canadian

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When I first started, all the media I ever got was, 'Hey! There's this Indian girl. And even though she is Indian, she gets views and stuff.'

I recently caught myself giving a pretty girl the cold shoulder because I felt intimidated. She was so gorgeous, and it made me feel insecure. I wasn't even aware until someone pointed it out to me. I was so embarrassed! I recognized those thoughts and made a point to be more friendly to her because there was no reason to be cold.

I think what people like about my channel is that I am not perfect. I always point to my pimple, my bad hair day... people relate to that. They are watching somebody who is exactly like them and talking about things that they experience as well.

A majority of my YouTube friends I've made because I made a trip down to California and literally tweeted them saying, 'Hey! Come over - let's shoot something!' And then two strangers will just meet up, talk, and shoot something.

No matter what I put out, somebody will be offended. I made a video on 10 reasons to smile, and it has dislikes. That should be an indication that there will be some who get offended no matter what you do. The best you can do as an entertainer or as someone who performs is to follow what you believe in.

I think why my content does so well with so many different types of people is because it speaks to everyone. I'll make a Soca music reference, I'll use a Tamil word, I'll do a Jamaican Patois accent. I know about all these people, and I'm not afraid to indulge in their culture.

The sad reality is that girl-on-girl hate is such a big issue in schools, at work, or online, and it never made any sense to me because, as women, we know how awesome other women can be.

I don't say no as much as I should. I'm an extreme workaholic. So I can be sick, and I still say yes to anything. When you are the CEO of your own company, editor of your own videos, your own writer ,and you do every role yourself, you have a hard time saying no to opportunities.

The good thing about me is, I only do deals with people that I love to begin with.

I am absolutely terrified to move... I truly, truly believe that success lies outside of your comfort zone, and my house has been the greatest comfort zone for me.

I've had fans do some pretty awesome things... I once had a fan do a mock proposal for me in Mumbai, inside a McDonalds... and I've had fans give me some precious things. I had one fan give me her mother's ring; I've gotten some pretty intense stuff. And I always get drawings and scrapbooks from fans, which is also pretty cool.

I still make videos in my bedroom by choice because that's the feel of my comedy, but the opportunity to make longer format content with a production company, with a team that's a bit more elevated in that sense, is really exciting for me because it's not that it's better than what I've already been doing, but it's different.

Sometimes I'm having conversations with my friends, and I feel like they can't relate to me anymore. I'm like, 'Oh, my God, let me tell you about my experience on 'Fallon'!' And they'll be like, 'Oh, my God, let me tell you about my trip to the mall!' It sometimes feels lonely.

When I make my own videos, I am the writer, the editor, the lighting person, everything - that's why my videos are blurry.