With 'Sin Nombre,' there are parts that I wish were longer. And with 'Jane Eyre' especially, there were parts that I had to compress that I thought it would have been really nice to spend more time with - to spend with the characters.

Cary Fukunaga

Cary Fukunaga

Profession: Film Director
Nationality: American

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I have no idea what it would be like to be just one thing and speak one language. I feel enormously privileged to travel and be able to mingle and speak to people that, had I only known English, I wouldn't have been able to meet.

It's hard because there's a part of me that wants 'True Detective' to win every award we're nominated for. But I'm a huge fan of 'Breaking Bad' and 'Game of Thrones.'

When I was a kid, I knew the black and white version of 'Jane Eyre,' and I guess I became interested in the idea of romantic love - of unrequited love and the tragedies of that; of what are the important things in life; what should one value over other materials.

I'm clearly not meant to be in front of the camera. I'm really not meant for anything but behind the camera.

Shakespeare is repeated around the world in different languages, just because it's good storytelling.

I live in Brooklyn, New York, and hail from the 'East Bay,' Oakland, CA.

'City of God' and 'Slumdog Millionaire' are both films that I really like, but they are stylistically the opposite of what I wanted to do.

I enjoy setting the scene and coming up with interesting frames. 'True Detective' was a very hands-on set.

My grandma was really sick when I was working on 'Sin Nombre' and eventually died that summer when we were finishing the film. But I was able to bring an unfinished version of the film for her to watch.

Have you seen McConaughey in 'Unsolved Mysteries?' Even back then, it's a great performance! And he's mowing the lawn.

As storytellers, you're always somehow creating history.

I want to have a nice country home one day, yeah.

'Sin Nombre' was almost like the adolescent version of 'Jane Eyre.' 'Jane Eyre' sort of picks up where 'Sin Nombre' ends. It's about this girl who starts off on her own at her lowest point of despair, and she figures out how she got there.

I'm definitely sensitive to the idea of exploitation. You don't want to glamorize certain things.