Education is a bubble in a classic sense. To call something a bubble, it must be overpriced, and there must be an intense belief in it.

Peter Thiel

Peter Thiel

Profession: Entrepreneur
Nationality: German

Some suggestions for you :

Technologies like PayPal foster competition because they enable people to shift their funds from one jurisdiction to another, and I think that ultimately will lead to a world in which there's less government power and therefore more individual control.

I think people in Europe are generally pessimistic about the future. They have low expectations; they're not working hard to change things. When you're a slacker with a pessimistic view of the future, you're likely to meet those expectations.

How to teach people to do what hasn't been done is a great riddle.

I worked at a law firm in New York very briefly.

The best start-ups might be considered slightly less extreme kinds of cults. The biggest difference is that cults tend to be fanatically wrong about something important. People at a successful start-up are fanatically right about something those outside it have missed.

Airbnb is undervalued.

It's good to test yourself and develop your talents and ambitions as fully as you can and achieve greater success; but I think success is the feeling you get from a job well done, and the key thing is to do the work.

I think anything that requires real global breakthroughs requires a degree of intensity and sustained effort that cannot be done part time, so it's something you have to do around the clock, and that doesn't compute with our existing educational system.

Anti-aging is an extremely under-explored field.

You'll attract the employees you need if you can explain why your mission is compelling: not why it's important in general, but why you're doing something important that no one else is going to get done.

I do think there is this danger that our society has made its peace with decline. I'd like to jolt them out of their complacency a little bit.

I believe that people are too complacent about technology.

Every one of today's smartphones has thousands of times more processing power than the computers that guided astronauts to the moon.

'Perfect competition' is considered both the ideal and the default state in Economics 101. So-called perfectly competitive markets achieve equilibrium when producer supply meets consumer demand.