I can go to my premiere at the Chinese Theatre, and everyone will know me, and everyone will cater to me. And then I'll go to an audition and get rejected left, right and centre. They don't watch my videos, and they don't really know who I am. It is like starting from scratch when it comes to traditional Hollywood.

I got into psychology simply because that's what my sister did, and I grew up in a family that was very, like, 'Follow your sister's footsteps.' I went to the same school she went to, did the same degree she did... really had no interest in it, to be honest.

I really have this desire to make it known that the Internet exists and YouTubers are important. And not only are YouTubers important, our followings are incredible.

My inspiration comes from my real life experiences.

My partnership with YouTube is one that I really, really treasure and I want to carry through. I mean, I don't just say it because I work with them; I genuinely am a fan of YouTube, so that's where I'd want to see my content.

It's really important to talk to yourself and look at yourself in the mirror and love who you are.

Growing up, I was always creatively inclined, and when YouTube came about, it was like getting the perfect platform to showcase what I wanted. Personally, I was going through a dark phase in my life, and I decided to make videos and basically go by the adage, 'If you want to cheer up yourself, go cheer up someone else.'

I'm like, 'I think I'm just going to wear what makes me happy,' so I'm just really big on wearing things that reflect my personality, like colorful hats and weird shoes and things that I just think are fun.

I've discovered home is not a place anymore. It's the people around you.

When I was younger, I had this fairy tale that you can have the eight hours of sleep and be a healthy, balanced person and still achieve your goals. The reality is, that hasn't always been the case.

I think one of the most beautiful things about YouTube is that it makes the world a smaller place. You realize that we're all different, but we're all the same. And if you think about it, it's a beautiful concept.

If you say, 'I don't want to offend anyone,' then don't get on stage. Just ask yourself, 'Do I think it is right? Do I think it is offensive? And do I think that everyone is okay to hear this? If I truly believe this, then I should go and do this.'

I'm the type of person who doesn't hope, dream or wish for things. I work and work and work.

The best way to describe my work is comedy in a very, very real way. I'm not scared to look silly on camera. I take everyday situations we all go through and put a very real twist on it - things people can relate to.

I'm by no means an expert at giving advice on depression, but I would say that a lot of my show is about making the decision to be happy. We all think that happiness is something that just falls into our lap. But it's something you have to really work on.

There's no escalators - there's only staircases to success. There is no substitute for hard work.

You have a character who is wearing a scarf on her head on a billboard in LA, New York, Sydney and Melbourne. That's how I would face barriers being thrown at me.

I don't say no as much as I should. I'm an extreme workaholic. So I can be sick, and I still say yes to anything. When you are the CEO of your own company, editor of your own videos, your own writer ,and you do every role yourself, you have a hard time saying no to opportunities.

I'm a South Asian female that talks about relationships and periods and dating and all these things.

I wanted to be a musician. I wanted to be a superstar. I wanted to be on stage. I wanted to perform. I wanted to be in movies. But as you grow up, those dreams kind of fade away, and you're hit with reality, and you're like, 'Oh, not everyone can be Lil' Bow Wow?' Fine.

Sometimes I'll be sitting on Facebook at home and see all these people getting married, having kids, having that life that I was told I should have. And sometimes I feel like I'm doing something wrong. Am I the stupid one here? Am I not doing what I'm supposed to do? And that's also equally as stressful.

If you want to make YouTube your career, you have to accept that it is also a business. I know everyone's like, 'It's my passion, it's my hobby.' And that's fine; I support that. But if you want to make it your career, it does have a business side.

Honestly, I just wear what makes me feel good. So many people come up to me, and they're like, 'Did you know you're a tomboy? You should try wearing dresses.'

When I first started, all the media I ever got was, 'Hey! There's this Indian girl. And even though she is Indian, she gets views and stuff.'

I swear Kim Kardashian's first marriage lasted longer than some of my iPhone chargers.

When I was younger, I always wanted to be someone in the entertainment industry.

My creative process is a bit manic at times, to be honest. I wake up Monday and Thursday stressed because I don't have a video. I usually - with the exception of maybe a handful of videos - wake up, write the video, shoot the video, edit the video, release the video all in the same day.

I'm an extreme workaholic.

I like to describe my stuff as observational comedy.

My fans are honestly so unique and so similar. Wherever I travel, they are so, so different but so the same.

Regardless of where life has taken me, I'm always excited to come back to Canada. I will forever be a proud Canadian. In fact, a lot of my success comes from the fact that I come from a diverse place, and that translates into my comedy. I will always be Team Canada.

Everything I do with my day is related to Superwoman. I'm either doing conference calls or writing a script or reading a script, editing a video, shooting a video.

I think what people like about my channel is that I am not perfect. I always point to my pimple, my bad hair day... people relate to that. They are watching somebody who is exactly like them and talking about things that they experience as well.

The good thing about me is, I only do deals with people that I love to begin with.

Everyone's voice should be heard when it comes to racial barriers.

There is no casting director; there is no producer monitoring your upload button. Anyone that looks like anyone can upload a video. I think YouTube and the digital space does set a really good example for the rest of the industry in that sense.

When I was coming out of depression, I made one random video. It wasn't funny or anything, but just the idea that people I didn't know were watching it made me feel less alone than I'd felt in a long time.

Growing up, I idolised Madhuri Dixit. She's my favourite actress, and I used to pretend I was her all the time.

A majority of my YouTube friends I've made because I made a trip down to California and literally tweeted them saying, 'Hey! Come over - let's shoot something!' And then two strangers will just meet up, talk, and shoot something.

You need a really solid foundation of friends and family to keep you where you need to be.

I was the first South Asian female to do comedy videos on YouTube. But at the same time, all races face their barriers, and I've learned through YouTube, if it's not race, it will be sexism, if it's not sexism, it will be homophobia. It will always be something, and all voices should be heard.

I'm my own boss, my own editor, my own shooter, my own writer, everything. This is all stuff I learned through trial and error... failing at a lot of things has taught me how to succeed at them eventually... you roll with the punches.

I'm a Beyonce fan, and when I'm looking at her, I'll think 'Oh my God, her life is so awesome, and she made it.'

I still make videos in my bedroom by choice because that's the feel of my comedy, but the opportunity to make longer format content with a production company, with a team that's a bit more elevated in that sense, is really exciting for me because it's not that it's better than what I've already been doing, but it's different.

A big part of depression is feeling really lonely, even if you're in a room full of a million people.

Every day, something new gets thrown at me, and I'm like, 'How did this happen?' I've gone through some of the craziest life experiences because of YouTube.

Life is designed to knock you down. It will knock you down time and time again, but it doesn't matte

When I started out the videos, I was dealing with depression, and I wanted to make inspiring videos for others, which would end up inspiring me in turn. I wanted to show the world that it was possible to make a positive switch in life and start over.

On an average day, I will spend 90 percent of my waking moments working on 'Superwoman.' I'm a huge workaholic. My hobby is 'Superwoman.'