The Northwest Passage is Canadian. People can't just abuse it.

I think growing an economy is a good way to help with a deficit, but ultimately, it's about fiscal discipline and responsible spending - and smart decisions.

We require Canadians who are collecting EI benefits to prove they are looking for work. It's only fair that we require employers looking to benefit from the Temporary Foreign Worker Program to prove they really need it.

I think it's hard to know how one deals in situations of confrontation until you're actually in there, so I'm not going to speculate on what I would do.

If we wander around as politicians jumping at every shadow and desperately afraid of having our words taken out of context or attacks layered on in an unfair way, I think we're actually doing a disrespect to Canadians, to people's intelligence.

I think Canadians have always been interested in the choices Americans make because the choices you make inevitably impact upon us... and how we make sure that we get that balance right between continuing to have a good relationship and standing for the things we believe in is what we expect of ourselves.

I have no fears that on a purely merit basis, we will have an embarrassment of riches from which to choose in order to reach gender parity.

As a prime minister, my job is not to try and influence or opine on what a leader of a different country should be doing.

Canadians want to elect good people to be their voice in Ottawa.

My job is to do the best possible job for my country, and I wouldn't want someone else telling me what I should be doing in Canada.

In 2012, the Liberal Party affirmed overwhelmingly at the policy convention that we are a pro-choice party. It means that we are a party that defends women's rights, and therefore, it would be inconsistent for any Liberal MP to be able to vote to take away women's rights.

It's important that people understand who I am and where I come from and not just have it shaped by purely political discourse.

One of the reasons why Canadians are generally positively inclined towards immigration is we've seen over decades, over generations, that it works.

As politicians, we're very, very much trained to say something and stick with it.

My father raised us to step toward trouble rather than to step away from it.

People are very much worried that our kids are not going to inherit the same opportunities that we inherited from our parents.

Ours was not a normal or easy life.

The Liberal Party will not vote - no Liberal member of Parliament will vote - to take away a woman's right to choose.

We need to make sure we're all working together to change mindsets, to change attitudes, and to fight against the bad habits that we have as a society.

My mother is brilliant but emotional and very much gregarious and connected to people. My father was brilliant but focused and driven and very narrow-casted.

I became a high school teacher for many years because it was a very tangible, concrete way where I could make a difference, and quite frankly, the kids didn't care who my father had been, because it was late '90s; none of them were around or remembered my father.

Canada was built around a very simple premise. A promise that you can work hard and succeed and build a future for yourselves and your kids, and that future for your kids would be better than the one you had.

I think we're pretty much where we need to be on corporate taxes.

I'm not going to reduce the choices of Canadians at the ballot box by backroom deals or secret arrangements. I think that's a cause for cynicism more than anything else.

I am so proud of my family, and I am happy to give them all the limelight they want because heaven knows I got more than I need.

Open nominations means it is local Liberals who choose who gets to be their representative. But what that doesn't mean is that somebody can behave any which way and bully other people out of the nomination and then be the last person standing.

We know that trade, NAFTA, the free and open trade between Canada and the U.S. creates millions of good jobs on both sides of the border.

Certainly in a world where terrorism is a daily reality in the news, it's easy for people to be afraid. But the fact is that we laid out very clearly - and Canadians get - that it's actually not a choice between either immigration or security: that of course they go together.

When my dad left public life, I was 13 years old. I went through my teen years and into adulthood in relative anonymity. After my dad's funeral, I was suddenly recognizable to people I passed on the street.

From the very beginning, I've talked about how we're going to strengthen the middle class in this country.

I think people understand that if you're going to have a successful economy, you need people's potential to be realized. That means education. It means university education, sure, but it also means training, apprenticeships and various kinds of skills diplomas that we know are necessary.

I've made the commitment to Canadians that I'm going to stay myself, and I'm going stay open about it, and I'm going to make sure that the thoughtfulness with which I approach issues continues to shine through.

We provide our citizens upward mobility through economic opportunity.

I think I'd work on making sure that Canadians have opportunities to find good jobs, to grow, to gain stability in terms of pensions. The reality is that Canadians don't feel that our economy is working for us.

Let's not pretend we're in a global free market when it comes to agriculture. Every country protects, for good reason, its agricultural industries.

My mom has always been so generous and so sensitive and so vulnerable and yet exudes so much strength.

Quite frankly, I talk about the fact that I'm a feminist as often as I can, and every time I do, it gets huge reaction, and media reacts, and the Twitterverse explodes and things like that, because here I am saying I'm a feminist. I will keep saying that until there is no more reaction to that when I say it, because that's where we want to get to.

A Canadian on the ground in different parts of the world, whether they're a diplomat, an aid worker, or a soldier, has an extraordinary, powerful impact.

I have no regrets.

My whole life has been about figuring out the balance between knowing who I am and being who I am and accepting that people will come to me with all sorts of preconceptions.

I have spent an awful lot of time listening to Canadians, learning from them, working with them.

I think Canadians want to get a feel for the people who will serve them... and, for me, I think that Canadians will trust people who trust them.

I don't put a lot of stock into polls.

The Liberal party has always worked with multiple parties in the House to make sure we're being governed in the best interest of Canadians.

In regards to the United States, Canadians expect me to stand up for our values and defend our interests and to have a constructive relationship with our largest trading partner and closest neighbour.

My father, his values were anchored in the time, but they were also timeless, whether it's bilingualism, multiculturalism or the charter of rights and freedoms.

One of the jokes among our family was that whenever Dad went to the movies, he insisted on getting his senior citizen's discount. It was laughable to view him as a traditional senior citizen; he was one of the most robust people I ever knew. Until, very suddenly, he wasn't.

Since I became Liberal leader, I've focused on building a better Canada for the middle class.

I had to learn to dismiss people who would criticize me based on nothing, but I also had to learn not to believe the people who would compliment me and think I was great based on nothing. And that led me to have a very, very strong sense of myself and my strengths.