Casting directors I don't think are the best in Mexico at street casting. Whereas, I think, in New York and in L.A., that's more common; not so in Mexico. So it's up to you as a director in a lot of ways to go out and do that.

It's easy to make something avant garde. To do something in the traditional way is much more brave in the sense that you're - your technique is so much more exposed because there's not all this flashy stuff to distract the viewer.

I enjoy setting the scene and coming up with interesting frames. 'True Detective' was a very hands-on set.

Tom Hooper had done 'John Adams,' and David Lynch did 'Twin Peaks.' I figured I could do eight hours of television, and I wanted to.

It's a treat and daunting to be directing someone like Judi Dench, who's made more films than I'll ever make in my lifetime.

You need the actors to feel as much ownership of the performance and the direction of the story as you do to get the most out of everyone's potential. Part of it is just making sure we all have the same vision.

I eventually want to do writing on all the films, but not necessarily to be the writer. Writing is a painful, painful thing; it really is.

With 'Sin Nombre,' there are parts that I wish were longer. And with 'Jane Eyre' especially, there were parts that I had to compress that I thought it would have been really nice to spend more time with - to spend with the characters.

When I was 20, I was living in the Alps, snowboarding and studying political science. I blew out my knee, and I began to realize my days in the sport were numbered; the reality was I would never be a pro.

After 'Sin Nombre,' I just needed to take a break to go to completely different worlds.

'Victoria Para Chino,' my 2nd-year film at NYU, gave birth to 'Sin Nombre.'

My friends just make fun of me in some shape or form.

My mom loved the old black-and-white films.

I didn't grow up watching detective shows. I've never even seen an episode of 'CSI.'

Going from having an Atari to a laptop changed everything. It allows me to work anywhere I want and send my work home - I can work anywhere in the world.

The theoretical casting part of movies is the funnest part. You really can imagine so many different versions of a story based on who's embodying it.

There's nothing I find more lazy than unmotivated camerawork just to make things look interesting.

I don't believe happiness comes out of material gain, for sure.

I have a really good relationship with Focus Features; we had a wonderful time working together on 'Sin Nombre.'

I used to always make art for girls. That was the thing I did for girls to like me. I did portraits, drawings, letters that formed outlines of significant things in our relationship. Art. I just used art in general. It usually worked.

The anticipation-speculation that comes with a weekly schedule is a double-edged sword. Because people have more time to talk about things, some crazy ideas get a lot of attention.

Have you seen McConaughey in 'Unsolved Mysteries?' Even back then, it's a great performance! And he's mowing the lawn.

To be straight, I was kind of a dork, and in order to fulfill the creative fires burning inside me, I participated vigorously as a Civil War re-enactor through most of my teenage years, traveling across the country to participate in large scale reenactments - grandiose plays enacted by over weight history buffs and war enthusiasts alike.

I'm not a very sentimental person, so you're not going to find schmaltzy scenes in my movies.

When I was a kid, I knew the black and white version of 'Jane Eyre,' and I guess I became interested in the idea of romantic love - of unrequited love and the tragedies of that; of what are the important things in life; what should one value over other materials.

You work with the communities to make films. And you just don't go in and take over their territory.

If you're directing, it doesn't really matter any more if it's going straight to TV - what matters is whether you have the resources to make a story that moves you.

I'll definitely say that, before film school, I didn't have much of a film-history background. I didn't know much about classic cinema.

I'm not Mexican, and I'm not Central American. I'm from California.

My mom was married to a Mexican guy - a surfer - and so we'd kind of camp out on the beach the swell season.

In terms of tackling different subjects, I can't really think of anything I wouldn't want to try; that's the fun of it right? Each new style brings new challenges - not that you shouldn't focus on one and master it, but it takes so long to make a film, you just want to have some variety.

When you have a script, and you're discussing what it can be, and who going to play what role, that's a kind of like a fantasy football game. You can imagine these different dream teams interpreting these characters that only exist in your head.

I live in Brooklyn, New York, and hail from the 'East Bay,' Oakland, CA.

I think I learned discipline on 'Jane Eyre.' Charlotte Bronte's dialogue, the intellectual duel between Rochester and Jane Eyre's character, is so compelling that you didn't have to do much with the placement of cameras.

I love period pieces. But it's hard to get money to make costumed dramas, so we'll see.

There's a lot of two-hander dialogue in 'True Detective,' and I needed to place those guys in locations where there were other levels of visual storytelling. It didn't necessarily have to move the plot forward, but it had to add tone or add to the overall feeling.

I think I have this field around me that makes electronics work bad. It's not like an entropy thing; it happens very quickly.

I've certainly never been dying to go to England my entire life.

I don't storyboard, and I don't really shot list. I let the shots be determined by how the actors and I figure out the blocking in a scene, and then from there, we cover it.

'Jane Eyre' was one of those films that I was familiar with as a kid, and I always enjoyed the story.

I've written immense love letters that are supposed to be opened over days at a time.

My ideas tend to be either really big in terms of like, the logistics, or really small.

I have no idea what it would be like to be just one thing and speak one language. I feel enormously privileged to travel and be able to mingle and speak to people that, had I only known English, I wouldn't have been able to meet.

I binge write, basically. I do a lot of prep, research, setup. I'll have a pretty detailed outline. Sort of like a beat outline. And then I'll add little notes and dialogue ideas, and I'll just create a 20-page document.

'True Detective' would not pass The Bechdel Test.

It's rare that you can promote a love story and feel fear in a film.

Ed Norton is probably one of the smartest people I've ever met.

I'm clearly not meant to be in front of the camera. I'm really not meant for anything but behind the camera.

Some directors don't get involved in the cinematography and are just about story, but I'm definitely more tactile than that in terms of my involvement in the minutiae.