I want every child in America to eat a nutritious, delicious, sustainably sourced school lunch for free.

The biggest thing you can do is understand that every time you're going to the grocery store, you're voting with your dollars. Support your farmers' market. Support local food. Really learn to cook.

I think you have to plan ahead. When I go to the market on a Saturday, and I'm buying for family and friends, I'm thinking about what I'm going to eat on the weekend but also about what I'm going to make for the following week.

I really like having someone who knows about food and what goes well together make a meal for me.

If we don't preserve the natural resources, you aren't going to have a sustainable society. This is not something for Chez Panisse and the elite of San Francisco. It's for everyone.

I can remember the three restaurant experiences of my childhood. All I wanted to do on my birthday was to go to the Automat in New York... but I don't know if you consider that a real restaurant.

The decisions you make are a choice of values that reflect your life in every way.

I really am at a place where I think we need to feed every child at school for free and feed them a real school lunch that's sustainable and nutritious and delicious. It needs to be part of the curriculum of the school in the same way that physical education was part of the curriculum, and all children participated.

I believe there should be breakfast, lunch and afternoon snack, all for free and for every child that goes to school. And all food that is good, clean and fair.

I have a love affair with tomatoes and corn. I remember them from my childhood. I only had them in the summer. They were extraordinary.

Grass-fed cattle are leaner. But it's not true that they are less flavorful.

I came to all the realizations about sustainability and biodiversity because I fell in love with the way food tastes. That was it. And because I was looking for that taste I feel at the doorsteps of the organic, local, sustainable farmers, dairy people and fisherman.

I used to do calligraphy, and I'm afraid that has lapsed, but I've always been interested in book printing.

When I first went to Paris in 1965, I fell in love with the small, family-owned restaurants that existed everywhere then, as well as the markets and the French obsession with buying fresh food, often twice a day.

To have a basic ingredient that can be prepared a million different ways is a beautiful thing.

We have to bring children into a new relationship to food that connects them to culture and agriculture.

We have to understand that we want to pay the farmers the real price for the food that they produce. It won't ever be cheap to buy real food. But it can be affordable. It's really something that we need to understand. It's the kind of work that it takes to grow food. We don't understand that piece of it.

I eat meat, but no meat that isn't pastured is acceptable, and we probably need to eat a whole lot less.

If I weren't involved with food, I'd be working in architecture. Design is that critical to me.

I don't want food that comes from animals that are caged up and fed antibiotics. I am really suspicious of that kind of production of meat and poultry.

Organize yourself so you aren't struggling to shop at the last minute. When you have real food, it's very easy to cook.

A lot of equipment can get in the way of the connection with food, with touching and feeling.

I think health is the outcome of finding a balance and some satisfaction at the table.

When you have good ingredients, cooking doesn't require a lot of instruction because you can never go very wrong.

I wanted people to come to the restaurant and feel at home, so I put it in a house.

It's around the table and in the preparation of food that we learn about ourselves and about the world.

Everything tastes better with butter. Meat that has fat in it is tender in a certain way, flavorful in a certain way. It's hard to deny the flavor quotient there.

We need to have a course in school that teaches about ecology and gastronomy. I could imagine that all children could eat at school for free and that the cafeteria would become part of the school's curriculum.

I'm unwilling to eat food that has been adulterated.

I do feel like food should cost more, because we aren't paying farmers a living wage. It has to cost more.

Usually, cheap food is not nutritious. You're feeding people, but you're not really feeding people something that is good for them.

I think health is the outcome of eating well.

I really appreciate the many neighbourhoods of Berkeley. There is still the butcher, the baker and the candlestick maker. And it has the University of California, which is the greatest gift, to my mind, to be close to it. It keeps the place alive.

I feel it is an obligation to help people understand the relation of food to agriculture and the relationship of food to culture.

Food should be cheap, and labor should be cheap, and everything should be the same no matter where you go; whether it's a McDonald's in Germany or one in California, it should be the same. And this message is destroying cultures around the world. Needless to say, agriculture goes with it.

Basically, the person in the White House should be principled, should have a philosophy about food that relates directly to organic agriculture. I will continue to push for that.

First, kids should be involved in the production of their own food. They have to get their hands in the dirt, they have to grow things. They also have to become sensually stimulated, and the way to begin is with a bakery.

I'm focused on the next generation, because I think it's very hard to break the habit of adults who've got salt and sugar addictions and just ways of being in this world. It's very hard even for the most enlightened people at famous universities that are very wealthy to spend the money that it takes to feed the students something delicious.

We make decisions every day about what we're going to eat. And some people want to buy Nike shoes - two pairs, and other people want to eat Bronx grapes and nourish themselves. I pay a little extra, but this is what I want to do.

I feel that good food should be a right and not a privilege, and it needs to be without pesticides and herbicides. And everybody deserves this food. And that's not elitist.

We eat every day, and if we do it in a way that doesn't recognize value, it's contributing to the destruction of our culture and of agriculture. But if it's done with a focus and care, it can be a wonderful thing. It changes the quality of your life.

You have to take it upon yourself and preserve and can foods that you'll want for the winter.

I feel like old age in America is a very sad thing. I have been many different places around the world where getting older is something you look forward to.

When you don't have much money, cooking can be incredibly reassuring. You feel like you're doing meaningful work.

I try not to do anything that's immoral.

Whenever I want to know how to cook something, I can't ask one chef - I have to ask six.

English food writer Elizabeth David, cook and author Richard Olney and the owner of Domaine Tempier Lulu Peyraud have all really inspired the way I think about food.

Food isn't like anything else. It's something precious. It's not a commodity.

It's hard to come into a new relationship with food unless you're engaged in an interactive way at an early age; it's hard to change your values.